Rapper Mystikal breaks silence on dropped rape charge


Broadway star Karen Olivo protests Scott Rudin silence


10 emerging writers receive $50,000 Whiting Awards

Review: An intimate, wordless portrait of a pig in 'Gunda'

Kim Godwin named ABC News president, CBS' Zirinsky to exit

Queen returns to royal duties after death of Prince Philip

The disabled hope their Oscar moment can become a movement

Review: Sexy rom-com loses steam between Friday and 'Monday'

'The Bachelor' star Colton Underwood comes out as gay

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Italian TV host apologizes for gestures mimicking Asians

The gonzo art of writing for 'Borat Subsequent Moviefilm'

Review: A book celebrating Black American farming history

On 'Promising Young Woman,' consent, and a harrowing ending

Cover unveiled for Clinton-Penny novel 'State of Terror'

TV

FILE - Colton Underwood from the reality series,

'The Bachelor' star Colton Underwood comes out as gay

Colton Underwood, the former football tight end who found fame on "The Bachelor" has revealed that he is gay.


Italian TV host apologizes for gestures mimicking Asians

Nielsen, networks clash on stats showing fewer viewers

Harrison Ford, Brad Pitt join Oscars starry presenting cast

Chauvin trial puts Court TV's revival in the public eye

Movies

Rapper Mystikal poses for a portrait in Baton Rouge, La. on Jan. 22, 2021. Mystikal, whose birth name is Michael Lawrence Tyler, plans to start work on a live instrumentation project. (AP Photo/Rusty Costanza)

Rapper Mystikal breaks silence on dropped rape charge

New York (AP) - Mystikal, convicted almost two decades ago of sexual battery and recently cleared of a second allegation of rape and kidnapping, acknowledges his past puts him in a "horrible fraternity." But the rapper says he's ready to move on from the sexually-charged songs of his past and is seeing his career rekindle.


Review: An intimate, wordless portrait of a pig in 'Gunda'

The disabled hope their Oscar moment can become a movement

Review: Sexy rom-com loses steam between Friday and 'Monday'

The gonzo art of writing for 'Borat Subsequent Moviefilm'

Health

FILE - In this Wednesday, Feb. 3, 2021, file photo, a passenger wears a face mask she travels after take off from Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta. A new study says leaving middle seats open could reduce the risk of airline passengers contracting the virus that causes COVID-19. The study was published Wednesday, April 14, 2021 by researchers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and Kansas State University. (AP Photo/Charlie Riedel, File)

Study finds that blocking seats on planes reduces virus risk

A new study says leaving middle seats open could give airline passengers more protection from the virus that causes COVID-19.


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