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Locals Honor Fallen Civil War Heroes

Created: 08/16/2014 10:47 PM KAALtv.com
By: Steph Crock

(ABC 6 News) -- It's been nearly 150 years since the Civil War ended but still today, people are honoring the men and women who lost their lives during that time. Only 20 men were brought back to Minnesota to be buried out of the more than 800 killed at the battle of Nashville.

Two of those soldiers were laid to rest at a cemetery in Plainview. This weekend-long event held there is dedicated to them and one other Minnesota soldier. It’s a way the "Soldier’s Recognition Subcommittee,” with the Governor's Civil War Task Force is paying tribute.

"I've been a Civil War reenactor for 15 years," said Diane Buganski, a reenactor with Third Minnesota Regiment Volunteer Infantry Company C. Incorporated. They come to these events in full character, even spending the night at base camp. "Sometimes it can be blistering in the heat and other times we've woken up to ice in our water buckets it's been so cold," said Buganski.

They do it with big purpose…“To teach people about what happened during the Civil War," said one of Third Minnesota’s newest members, Isaac Weberg.

"There are people that don't even know that Minnesota was involved in the Civil War," said Buganski.

They’re keeping history alive out here in Plainview, by educating the public on the Civil War and remembering those brave men and women who lived it. "The Civil War was so horrendous in death and the families…and 400,000 civil war soldiers are buried in unmarked graves. It’s unknown as to where they were buried," said Ken Flies with the Governor's Civil War Task Force. That subcommittee helped pull this event together.

Along with reenactments, is a rededication ceremony for the fallen soldiers who are buried in Plainview. "We hold ceremonies at the cemetery, much as we're doing here, and we get a new gravestone, a new marker, for these men if they don't have one," said Flies.

Though it can be a challenging weekend to go back in time, those involved say every second it worthwhile. "It makes it all that much more real because that's what happened," said Buganski.

"It gives you the appreciation of the reality of it, and it lives with you much deeper," said Flies.

The reenactments will continue through Sunday at Greenwood Cemetery in Plainview. Also on the schedule, Major General Rick Nash will lead the dedication event at 10:30 am, then at 1:30 pm there's a parade.

It's been nearly 150 years since the Civil War ended but still today, people are honoring the men and women who lost their lives during that time.