Posted at: 05/10/2013 6:43 PM
By: Katie Eldred

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Lourdes Looks Back at History, Unearthing Time Capsule

(ABC 6 NEWS) -- Lourdes High School students got a good look at their new school Friday morning. But before they took a look at their future they got a chance to uncover some of their past. The faculty opened a time capsule the school found in the cornerstone of their old building.

In May of 1941 the U.S. had yet to enter World War II and the only two tall buildings in Rochester were the Kahler and the Plummer building.

That was the last time students at Lourdes High School sat in a brand new building.

Before the students set off to explore their brand new high school for the first time they took a look at how they got here from a piece of their old building. The cornerstone of their original 1940 building.

Principal Suzanne Lagerwaard was just one of the faculty members there when they opened up a time capsule planted in the building back in 1941.

"An exciting moment for all, I got goose bumps," said Lagerwaard.

Inside were old pictures, coins, newspapers, and hand written lists of the students that attended the school at the time. The items held a special significance for the faculty members that attended Lourdes High School themselves.

"When we were there in the 1959 building was just new," said Father Jerry Mahon.

Father Mahon and counselor Helen Restovich both attend Lourdes in the early sixties. For them it brought back vivid memories.

"I had gone to St. John’s Grade School and walked past the mother school every day when I was going over to Lourdes for lunch," said Restovich.

"They were able to share their stories and the stories they heard as young children," said Lagerwaard.

The items that once were everyday ordinary items are now historic artifacts. The students have already picked out what they will place in the times capsule in their new building.

"This is being created for a big future and I'm pretty sure they felt the same way," said Father Mahon.

"That's what we want someone 50 to 60 years from now to open of that box and to know our story," said Lagerwaard.

"History continues to unfold and there will be many changes, but the cornerstone remains the same," said Father Mahon.

The students are planning to finish up their new time capsule by next week. It will be placed behind the cornerstone of the new school.